Thursday, February 1, 2018

Four Tax Credits Can Mean a Refund for Individual Taxpayers

Taxpayers who are not required to file a tax return may want to do so. They might be eligible for a tax refund and don’t even know it. Some taxpayers might qualify for a tax credit that can result in money in their pocket. Taxpayers need to file a 2017 tax return to claim these credits.
Here is information about four tax credits that can mean a refund for eligible taxpayers:
  • Earned Income Tax Credit. A taxpayer who worked and earned less than $53,930 last year could receive the EITC as a tax refund. They must qualify for the credit, and may do so with or without a qualifying child. They may be eligible for up to $6,318. Taxpayers can use the 2017 EITC Assistant tool to find out if they qualify.
  • Premium Tax Credit.Taxpayers who chose to have advance payments of the premium tax credit sent directly to their insurer during 2017 must file a federal tax return to reconcile any advance payments with the allowable premium tax credit. In addition, taxpayers who enrolled in health insurance through the Health Insurance Marketplace in 2017 and did not receive the benefit of advance credit payments may be eligible to claim the premium tax credit when they file. They can use the Interactive Tax Assistant to see if they qualify for this credit.
  • Additional Child Tax Credit. If a taxpayer has at least one child that qualifies for the Child Tax Credit, they might be eligible for the ACTC. This credit is for certain individuals who get less than the full amount of the child tax credit.
  • American Opportunity Tax Credit. To claim the AOTC, the taxpayer, their spouse or their dependent must have been a student who was enrolled at least half time for one academic period. The credit is available for four years of post-secondary education. It can be worth up to $2,500 per eligible student. Even if the taxpayer doesn’t owe any taxes, they may still qualify. They are required to have Form 1098-T, Tuition Statement, to be eligible for an education benefit. Students receive this form from the school they attended. There are exceptions for some students. Taxpayers should complete Form 8863, Education Credits, and file it with their tax return.
By law, the IRS is required to hold EITC and Additional Child Tax Credit refunds until mid-February — even the portion not associated with the EITC or ACTC.  The IRS expects the earliest of these refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards starting February 27, 2018, if these taxpayers choose direct deposit and there are no other issues with their tax return.
Instructions for Forms 10401040A or 1040EZ list income tax filing requirements. Taxpayers can also use the Interactive Tax Assistant tool on IRS.gov to answer many tax questions. They should look for “Do I need to file a return?” under general topics.
This tax tip covers information for tax year 2017 and is not affected by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017. Most of the changes in this legislation take effect in 2018 and will affect the tax returns filed in 2019.

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